#038 – Jesse & Listener Questions

Jesse and Darrel have fun answering listener questions, especially some crazy Christian questions about sex and relationships.

2 thoughts on “#038 – Jesse & Listener Questions”

  1. Dr. Ray, I liked the combo of humor and good information in this podcast. Jesse is a great co-host, I think you should have her on again.

    I do want to comment about the disagreement you had with Jesse over the “close relationship with family” question. I think Jesse was thinking well ahead of you here, and you missed her point. I’m sure she’s aware that continued inbreeding increases the risk of genetic defects. Her term “beautiful babies” was a short-hand for “healthy babies without avoidable genetic defects”. For the good of the show, I guess, she chose to back off on this, but I think her fundamental point is worth bringing back up.

    The value of a relationship is not determined by the potential for that relationship to produce healthy children.

    That’s point that got lost, and the talk of dog breeding and hemophilia was all irrelevant to the interesting question. Jesse mentioned that this is a flawed argument that’s often used against gay couples – they can’t have kids, so their relationship is somehow unnatural or deviant because of that. Obviously that is incorrect; a relationship between two people who can’t (or just don’t want to) have kids is still meaningful and desirable.

    Now, bring that insight back to the question of relationships with family members. The question of how much inbreeding increases the risk of genetic diseases is irrelevant (in just the same way) to close relationships with family. Consider scenario A) a step-brother and step-sister (not genetically related) grow up in the same nuclear family; as young adults they fall in love and form a long-term sexual relationship, and choose to raise one kid together. Versus scenario B) two full brothers grow up in the same nuclear family; as young adults they fall in love and form a long-term sexual relationship, and choose to raise one kid together. Versus C) the common scenario involving two people who share neither genetic relationship nor family, or D) the scenario you mentioned on the podcast of a couple who are genetically related but did not share a family.

    It’s not clear there is any reason, other than a socially programmed “yuck” response, to judge these relationships differently.

    1. Tim, I believe you are correct. Can’t really argue with your analysis. In the rush of discussion and editing, I think I totally missed her point. She and I are good friends, so I’ll let her know of your comment. Thanks for listening to the podcast.
      I hope you will “follow” it on Spreaker and “Like” our Facebook page. Please give it a rating on iTunes. http://www.spreaker.com/user/drdray/041-candace-gorham

      https://www.facebook.com/DrRayLifeCoach

      Thanks for letting me know. It is great to hear it makes a difference.

      Dr. Darrel Ray

Comments are closed.